image

 

For large companies, Twitter has proven to be a successful tool. What about for small businesses? Billions of people tweet each week to make their presence known in the digital world. Here are some ways for your small business to get started on Twitter.

In today’s day and age, your customers are undoubtedly on Twitter. So, shouldn’t your business be on Twitter as well? With your client-base interacting on the web, don’t miss the opportunity to be a part of their conversations.  

The first step is shaping your voice on Twitter. Every business has an online identity, and making sure your voice matches that identity is essential. Make sure your business’ tweets are personable because people respond most amicably to friendly, conversational tweets. Sharing your content with links and pictures is a great way to interact with your customers to make your small business seem more likeable. Show them the ins and outs of your business and make them feel like you are a part of their community.

The more conversations that are going on about your business, the more followers you accumulate, and more followers lead to more customers.

So, let’s go over the basics so that you can best use Twitter to your advantage:

The Hashtag: (Any word or phase beginning with the # sign.) This allows people to organize conversations and refines search results for that term.

Mention: This allows you to bring a specific tweet that is of interest to you to your followers’ attention.

Retweet: If you like a specific tweet or want the rest of your followers to see that tweet, simply hit the Retweet button it. This sends the original tweet to all your followers. At the same time, it also gives you the opportunity to respond to tweets that you like or are about your business.

Links: Twitter has a link-shortening feature that allows you to reduce a link to only 19 characters. When you want to share something, or direct your customer’s attention to a specific link, the link-shortener makes it easier to fit everything you want to say into the 140-character limit.

By: Kyle Sutter